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ICS Announces Recipients of Technical Assistance for PFS in Early Childhood Sector

The Institute for Child Success (“ICS”), a grantee of the Social Innovation Fund’s (SIF) Pay for Success (PFS) program, announced the selection of the first five organizations to receive technical assistance from ICS under that program. This technical assistance will help jurisdictions move towards implementing Pay for Success financing to improve outcomes for young children.

“We were thrilled by the applications we received for the inaugural year of this project, and we could not be more excited to be working with these jurisdictions. We look forward to helping these jurisdictions advance their efforts to improve outcomes for children through PFS financing,” said ICS Vice President Joe Waters.

The awardee’s announced today include:

  • The State of Connecticut, working to scale Triple P (Positive Parenting Program), an evidence based program to prevent child abuse and neglect
  • The State of North Carolina, working to improve children’s health and literacy by expanding early childhood home visiting and literacy programs
  • The City of Spartanburg, South Carolina, working to expand high-quality early care and education programs to increase kindergarten readiness, reading and math proficiency, and high school and post-secondary graduation rates while reducing avoidable expenditures on remediation
  • The County of Sonoma County, California, working to expand early childhood home visiting and high-quality pre-kindergarten to improve community health and educational attainment
  • The Washington State Department of Early Learning and Thrive by Five—in partnership with a fellow SIF-grantee, Third Sector Capital Partners—working to enhance child development and well-being, reduce child abuse and neglect, and promote school readiness by expanding early childhood home visiting programs, especially in Native American communities.

Pay for Success is an innovative funding model that drives government resources toward social programs that prove effective at providing results to the people who need them most. The model gives highly effective service providers, including nonprofits and charities, access to flexible, reliable, and upfront resources to tackle critical social problems by tapping private funding to cover the up-front costs of the programs. Independent project managers support the collaboration between service providers, government, and funders. By rigorously measuring the effectiveness of these programs over time, Pay for Success ensures increased accountability for government spending and taxpayer dollars are being spent on programs that are actually succeeding in improving people’s lives. Seven Pay for Success programs have been launched in the United States, including two that expand early childhood programs.

While PFS is an exciting model with a range of benefits, it is also technically difficult to deploy and few organizations in the early childhood community have developed the required expertise. The Social Innovation Fund’s investment in ICS, along with matching funds from ReadyNation, United Way of Greenville County, and Greenville Health System, is fueling this initiative to build that expertise and capacity for PFS within the early childhood community.

“The SIF’s Pay for Success grantees held highly competitive, open competitions to select communities in need of services and here we’re seeing the results of those competitions,” said Lois Nembhard, Acting Director of the Social Innovation Fund. “We couldn’t be more enthusiastic for the first Pay for Success subgrantees, all charged with the important mission to measurably improve the lives of people most in need.”

[Edit: While North Carolina originally was selected as a technical assistance jurisdiction, ICS and NC later came to a mutual decision to to discontinue this partnership. ICS will complete the technical assistance with the remaining four jurisdictions, and we look forward to future opportunities to partner with NC.]

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